Friday, December 23, 2011

Website of Clive Russell Henthorne

Today I'm thinking of my friend, Clive Russell Henthorne
of
Manchester, England.

Here's a link to his website.
It's been a long time since there have been any updates.
Enjoy the information he shared.


Sunday, September 18, 2011

Writing Stories in Personal Historian 2



There's a new version of Personal Historian. I don't own a copy of this program, but it does look interesting. This is a link to information on Facebook. (Let's see if I can share it with Blog This!)

Friday, September 16, 2011

Blog Your Family History



A very nice article on the Family Search website about using blogs to share your genealogy information. If you are reading this blog you already know that I have been doing this with two Google blogs for a number of years.

16 September 2011
Mr. Dickie

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Screen Capture Apps | TechTips | FamilySearch

Here's an article about how to use screen capture applications to enhance your genealogy presentations. It's a topic I want to learn more about now that I have a computer that can easily do this type of thing. Have you tried it? Do you have an example I can point to?


Thursday, August 25, 2011

Relatives and Ancestors


Some people are your relatives but others are your ancestors, and you choose the ones you want to have as your ancestors. You create yourself out of these values. (Ralph Ellison)

Our pool of ancestors is vast. When we take time to study our history, we need to recognize the individual greatness, dignity, and style of our ancestors -- and use their lives as models for our own. (Both of the above from Black Pearls by Eric V. Copage, 25 August) 25 August 2011

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Foolish Speculations and Genealogies

What Do You Make Of This?

But have nothing to do with foolish speculations and genealogies and contentious and legalistic battles. (The words of Paul in Titus 3:8-11, The Letters To Titus by William Barclay, p. 302) 16 August 2011

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Google: The Digital Research Assistant | TechTips | FamilySearch


This link is from the Family Search Tech Tips blog. It points to a blog posting about using Google to help with our genealogy. I just found it today. For my own personal enjoyment I added the blog to my Google Reader which thus makes it easy for me to follow.

Google: The Digital Research Assistant | TechTips | FamilySearch

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Don't stop at 1930 ...

Here's a blog post that I discovered with my Google Reader. I thought it was worth sharing. I used Blog This! to post it to my blog.

The author was: Mary Cain Minton and her blog is "family lines."
Mr. Dickie

***********************************************************


Don't stop at 1930 ...: "
Still trying to find that perfect way to keep track of the family tree’s twigs and branches as I try to extend them. I want to avoid over-emphasis on any one section, but tracking a particular line of descendants gets so fascinating I tend to ignore the others for long periods of time. I guess you could call this going out on a limb...
One thing I have learned from doing this is that finding a family in the 1930 census may seem like the end of the line (until 2012, when the 1940 census is released), but it really is not. Remember, the Social Security Death Index (free on Rootsweb) gives clues to many people who died after Social Security was instituted. Of course, some were excluded in the early days (housewives, farmers, railroad workers among others), and the birth names of married women did not necessarily show up. But, still, it is a resource worth checking.
Post-1930 obituaries are easier to find than earlier ones, too. I have good luck tracking people with moderately unusual names (Clayton Luscombe and Oakland Shoemaker, for instance), in Mocavo, the genealogical search engine. But Mocavo is good for more than obits and with its focus on family history, its hits are easier to sift through than Google’s (but do try both).
As I mentioned last time, findagrave.com has been a great help. Besides relatives’ dates and burial places, I have found photos of tombstones, and even family pictures, on this website. It used to emphasize the rich and famous, but increasingly it covers more and more everyday folk in large and small cemeteries across the US.
One last tip: the database of World War I draft registration records, available on Ancestry, is a great source for finding out more about men born between 1872 and 1901. It is handy for finding their marital status, occupations, and, sometimes, those elusive middle names. A look at the original image will also give you the individual’s physical description, and his home address. Given the 29-year period it is not unusual to find a father and son registering at the same time. And here is a sub-tip: use your genealogy program’s “find” or “sort” feature to create a list of males born between the years of 1872 and 1900, and you have your likely candidates.
***********
Bittersweet story in the San Francisco Chronicle recently (July 14, 2011). Edward L. O’Toole was an infantry soldier from San Francisco, just 23 years old, when he died in a battle in Germany in late 1944. His remains have just recently been recovered and identified.
Although he was one of seven children, there are no longer any close surviving relatives. When he was reported missing and presumed dead, his mother and sister, now long gone, erected a memorial stone at the Golden Gate National Cemetery, and it is there his remains have now been interred.
A local paralegal, Bernadette Hooper, was intrigued by the story, and has managed find out more details about his life and family history. (Don’t you bet she’s a genealogist?) It is all detailed in the Chronicle story, written by Carl Nolte. You can read it here.
"

Friday, July 29, 2011

It's A Hobby

If we enjoy a hobby, is that not marvelous in itself?
(Larsen and Hegarty, Believing In Myself, 26 June)

Monday, July 25, 2011

Dally Memorial Library

The website of the Dally Memorial Library in Sardis, (Monroe county) OH. The library also has a Page on Facebook.

dallyhome

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Enjoying a Hobby

If we enjoy a hobby is that not marvelous in itself? (Larsen and Hegarty, Believing In Myself, 26 June)

Sunday, July 3, 2011

Raymond Martin Bell

Five Methodist families of western Pennsylvania, 1785: Henthorn, Jones, Lackey, Murphy, Pumphrey; by Raymond Martin Bell. Coralville, Iowa : R.M. Bell, 1997. LC: F148 .B45 1997 Dewey: 929/.3748


A copy of this item is available at The Library of Congress. Professor Bell is deceased. We had a short correspondence about the time he moved to Iowa.
3 Jul 2011

Genealogy Index for Clark County, Indiana, United States of America


This is something that might be of interest to Henthorn researchers. One or more GEDCOM files for the Henthorn family are listed. I was able to display the file contents on my computer screen. The file listed the name of the person who created the file and gave credit to another researcher for the information.

You should be able to download the GEDCOM file(s) to your own computer for loading into your own genealogy program. If anyone does this I'd like to hear from you. We could post a report of your findings on this blog.
3 Jul 2011

Some Pennsylvanians in 1772


From James Veach's The Monongahela of Old or Historical Sketches of Southwestern Pennsylvania to the Year 1800.

Listed are Henthorn, Watson and Cresap. There is at least one misspelling of the Henthorn surname.
3 Jul 2011

Friday, July 1, 2011

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Monroe County Chapter of Ohio Genealogical Society - Homepage

I don't remember when I last posted a link to this site. In recent months I've been helping by making some changes to the website. There's more work to do and I have move to learn. The next project is to get the website search tool, on the homepage working.

If you haven't visited this website for a while, it's worth a look. I checked all links to make certain they worked. I shared some of my own pages with Monroe county information and I also added many easy to use links to pages on the website of Richard Harrington.

Monroe County Chapter of Ohio Genealogical Society - Homepage

14,000 People Wrongly Reported Deceased Annually

Dick Eastman article about what happens when the Social Security Administration declares someone dead when they aren't.

14,000 People Wrongly Reported Deceased Annually

(Posted from NetWorkedBlogs to my Henthorn Genealogy News blog using a BlogThis! button I installed on the Chrome browser.)

Monday, June 20, 2011

Little Black Pickup


It's just a click away.

Deep pockets Not Required

Deep pockets not required: (By Mary Cain Minton)

In all my years of chasing clues to my family’s history, I’ve tried to keep a close eye on expenses. I grant you, it is sometimes necessary to fork over a few dollars for that critical document, or to join an organization with emphasis on your research area. Or even to save up for a trip to the home turf. But still … this enthusiasm of ours does not have to break the bank.
I did tentatively accept a subscription to a major for-profit genealogy firm once, but trying to cancel at the end of my “trial” period was a real headache (no phone number! no address!). Sometimes membership offers are so confusing you think you’re getting one “tier” of records and really you’re into more money for another group you don’t even need. Then too, some outfits appear on the horizon for a few years (or months) and then disappear, leaving their members in the lurch, completely out of luck or tacked onto the subscriber list of some other irrelevant service.

By now the big players are pretty well established, and if you are so inclined, fee-based memberships can provide quick and easy access to certain types of documents. (As well as some rather questionable “family trees.”) On the other hand, there are many free and low-cost ways to find much of what you are seeking.
I live in a California county with a library system that provides home access to Heritage Quest for its card-carrying patrons. That means indexes and images for many (though not all) US census records, a way to search over 28,000 family and local histories, access to the PERSI index to articles in many genealogical publications, and more. On site at any of the library branches, I can also log onto the “Library Edition” of Ancestry.
Another resource I use almost daily is the FamilySearch website, that well-known Mormon entity. Their religious emphasis on posthumous baptism has inspired the creation of the world’s largest collection of genealogical materials. And their Family History Library in Salt Lake City is a genealogist’s dream -- open to all, no strings, no subtle pressures or proselytizing. They are presently underway on a mammoth project to place online their millions (literally) of microfilmed records from all over the world. With the help of an army of trained and supervised volunteers, they are making new material available over the Internet just about every day -- and their indexing is of the highest quality.
One of the features that really helps me is their indexing of virtually all census records, in a “fuzzy” way that brings up “sound-alike” surnames -- something you don’t get with Heritage Quest. So I am always sure to check both indexes when a family member is eluding me.
I strongly suggest joining genealogical and/or historical societies in the states or counties of interest, too. That will often put you in touch with individuals who can help with your specific issue. Another place to look is local public libraries in your research area. They often have local history collections and may have old newspapers in their holdings. Go online first, and see what their catalog shows. Then send a note or email to the reference department. I’ve had good results from queries about old obituaries, land records, and other local information. Costs are usually quite low, or non-existent (but send them something anyway! They need it!).
There are far too may free and low-cost sites to name here, but I’d like to remind you of one more: Find a Grave. In their words, it is “a resource for finding the final resting place of family, friends, and ‘famous’ individuals. With millions of names and photos, it is an invaluable tool for the genealogist and family history buff.” I’ve had considerable luck finding names there and even photos of family gravestones, and after registering (free) was able to provide additional information and an image for one Civil War solder’s resting place.
So the next time someone tells you she thinks 'doing genealogy' is too expensive, just smile -- the same way you do when people say their family history is 'complete.'

Comment: This is a blog posting from one of the blogs I follow. I wanted to see if I could share it with you from Google Reader where I read the posting. There's always more to learn.

Mr. Dickie, 20 June 2011

Thursday, June 9, 2011

Box.Net

This morning I did some housekeeping on my Box.net account. About a half dozen people whom I offered collaborator access never responded. I deleted the invitations. That way it will be easier for me to track more recent invitations.

If I know you and we have shared genealogy information in the past, I'm always willing to entertain a request to gain access.

Also, keep in mind that I make lots of genealogy information available on the Internet without the need to accept an invitation.

Recently I shared some webpages on the website of the Monroe County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society (MCC-OGS) website. Some of the information came from a series of family articles written by Catharine (Foreaker) Fedorchak in the 1970's.

Friday, June 3, 2011

RootsMagic Blog � RootsMagic Classes now available on CD

RootsMagic Blog � RootsMagic Classes now available on CD

RootsMagic announces that two CDs of recent Webinars are now available for purchase. This may be of interest to friends who use this program for their geneealogy.

Friday, March 18, 2011

Monroe County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society

I have offered to help with the maintenance of the genealogy website of the Monroe County Chapter of the Ohio Genealogical Society. The website resides on the RootsWeb area of Ancestry.com. I don't know much about either RootsWeb or Ancestry.com. It should be an interesting learning experience.

Yesterday, using some suggestions from friends at the computer club, I was able to plug the information supplied to me by my contact in Ohio and gain access using Fire FTP which I have installed on my Mozilla Firefox browser. I'm reasonably confident that I have enough HTML knowledge to be able to make a contribution now that I can access the website. I don't have skill to do fancy things, but I believe what I know how to do will allow me to do some useful projects for the group. I'm looking forward to the challenge and the mental stimulation.

It's really fascinating that today's technology allows us to communicate and work together from widely separated geographic locations.

Mr. Dickie
18 Mar 2011

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Henthorns Rest: Blackberry Cobbler and Sassafras Tea

Henthorns Rest: Blackberry Cobbler and Sassafras Tea

Here's a nice piece written by Rodney Henthorn. At the bottom of his blog posting there was a spot that said Links to this post.

I clicked on it and that allowed me to post this link to what Rodney wrote on my own genealogy blog. That's cool!

Mr. Dickie
16 Mar 2011

Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Family Associations by Alan Smith

Family Associations by Alan Smith (Alan) on Myspace:

"Family Associations - Why join a Family Association"

Researcher and writer, Alan Smith, posted this article on his blog. Alan and I share an interest in the Hinthorn(e) surname.

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Hardesty's History of Monroe County, Ohio

This morning I uploaded to the MonroeCountyOhio folder of MyBox an "Index of Personal History Department" created by yours truly from History of Monroe County, Ohio, published by H.H. Hardesty and Co., in 1882. The file, an HTML table, is named, Hardesty.htm.

I hope you like how it turned out as much as I do. Perhaps I'll post a short description of the steps I went through to create this file on this blog. You might be surprised at how easy it was once I had the right free tool on my computer.

I regret that I didn't make this finding aide available sooner in the HTML format which can easily be viewed with your browser. Sometimes it takes me a long time to find a way to accomplish what I want to do.

There is also a "text" file of extractions from other pages of the Hardesty publication (Monroe.txt) available on MyBox. It's been there since December 2010. The extractions are paragraphs that were of interest to me during my active days of researching. I'd forgotten about this document. (My memory issues are becoming more evident with the passing months.)

BTW, I own a copy of the History. I'm willing to do look-ups for friends who have access to MyBox.

Mr. Dickie
2 Mar 2011

Sunday, February 27, 2011

New Links

I installed three links to West Virginia and Ohio genealogy websites in the sidebar links on my genealogy news and genealogy obits blogs. I consider myself privileged to know some of the people responsible for donating to and maintaining these websites.

These links will take you to these counties:
  • Monroe county, Ohio
  • Wetzel county, West Virginia
  • Marshall county, West Virginia
Mr. Dickie
27 Feb 2011

Saturday, February 26, 2011

BBC News - Homeless Daniel Morales finds daughter by Twitter

BBC News - Homeless Daniel Morales finds daughter by Twitter:

26 February 2011

On a mobile phone Mr. Morales posted a series of Twitter messages saying he was looking for his daughter, Sarah

They had been apart for a decade, but in the end all it took to reunite a homeless father and his daughter was a few 140-character messages on the social networking site, Twitter.

Yoho, Peter and Mary Jane McFadden

Most Wanted

William V. Dean, Sr. provided information about the Peter and Mary Jane (McFadden) Yoho family of Monroe Co., OH. As of January 1999 (still a mystery as of February 2011) we have been unable to link this branch of the Yoho family to the Yoho family tree.

Today I created a Most Wanted folder under the Yoho folder on MyBox. I added information about this Most Wanted family that was available until October 2008 on my AOL genealogy website.

Who will solve this linkage problem?

Mr. Dickie
26 Feb 2011

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Yoho, Samuel and Elizabeth Preble

I uploaded a five generation descendant chart for Samuel Yoho and Elizabeth Preble to MyBox. This report, in HTML format, includes the family of Charles and Anna (Brown) Yoho of Vermilion Co., IL. This report was available prior to October 2008 on my AOL website. This upload is part of my project to salvage work I did in the past.

Did you know there are two ways to spell Vermilion? When you are talking about the county in Illinois use one "L" and when you are talking about the neighboring county in Indiana use two "LL."

Members of the Henthorn family also lived in Danville, Vermilion Co., IL.

Access to MyBox is by invitation.

Mr. Dickie
24 Feb 2011

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

Yoho Burials


This afternoon I uploaded YOHOCEM.HTM to MyBox. This is a report I created about twelve years ago of Yoho Burials - with Cemetery Names Identified. There are over 420 burials listed. The report could be useful if you plan a cemetery visit or if you don't know where someone was buried.

The report is best viewed by downloading it to your browser for viewing or printing.

Mr. Dickie
23 Feb 2011

Johannas Yoho and Susanna Catherine Lau

Today I uploaded, YOHO1.HTM and YOHO2.HTM to MyBox on the Box.net.

This is a two-part, four generation, descendant chart for the family of Johannas Yoho and Susanna Catherine Lau in the HTML format, suitable for download and viewing with your web browser. There are approximately 24 pages in Part One and 9 pages in Part Two, if you decide to print the report.

To download click on the "Down" arrow at the right of the file information. Then click on the "Download" button. Don't use the Box.net "preview" function because it doesn't work as well.

For many years this webpage was available on my AOL website. After making a few changes I'm happy to be able to make it available again to those who have access to the appropriate folders on MyBox.

The file resides in the Yoho folder which is one of the folders in the Marshall-Wetzel-WV folder on MyBox.

Mr. Dickie
23 Feb 2011

Monday, February 21, 2011

New Obituary Postings

New Obituary Postings

Some time has passed since I last did much posting to my blog, Henthorn Genealogy Obits. Today I posted eleven items which could be salvaged from a Zip Disk with very little work on my part. I think I first shared these obituaries on my AOL website in the year 2000. They haven't been available on the Internet since the end of 2008.

There are thirty-six additional pieces available on the same Zip Disk. As time and interest permit I'll post the rest of them to the obituary blog.

Mr. Dickie
21 Feb 2011

John Henthorn (Hinthorn(e)) and Margaret Downard

Today I uploaded, Hinthorn.htm to MyBox on the Box.net. This is a five generation descendant chart for the family of John and Margaret (Downard) Henthorn (Hinthorn(e) in the HTML format, suitable for viewing with your web browser. For many years this webpage was available on my AOL website. After making a few changes I'm happy to be able to make it available again to those who have access to the appropriate folders on MyBox.

The file resides in the Hinthorn(e) folder which is one of the folders in the HenthornOther folder on MyBox.

Mr. Dickie
21 Feb 2011

Sunday, February 20, 2011

Libraries by Alan Smith


"Libraries are essential depositories of information not only for the genealogist, but for all of mankind. The ALA (American Library Association) has over 120,000 libraries of all kinds in the US. There are 29 different types of libraries from Public, Private, Reference, School, State and Presidential Libraries, Carnegie, Academic and even book mobiles to name a few."

******

Alan Smith lives in the western part of the United States. He is interested in the history and genealogy of the Hinthorn(e) family. He is an avid and published writer. One of his projects is the annual publication of Alkali Flats Gazette the annual Smith family newsletter which he has shared with me for many years.

Mr. Dickie
20 Feb 2011

Location of John's Yoho's Land

Location of John's Land:

"John Yoho's Winchester Land" by Hugh L. Yoho

Yoho Family Genealogy Forum

Yoho Family Genealogy Forum:

"Yoho Family Genealogy Forum"

John and Jacob Yoho Problem

John and Jacob Yoho Problem:

"The John and Jacob Yoho Problem By Hugh Yoho"

Relationships

Relationships
by
Richard E. Henthorn


I have seen a number of tables which outline family relationships. This is an attempt to convey the same information for six generations in a textual manner, rather than in a table.

The information is from the male point of view.

Your Father is the:
  • Brother of your uncle
  • Uncle of your first cousin
  • Great Uncle of your first cousin's child
  • GG Uncle of your first cousin's grandchild
  • GGG Uncle of your first cousin's great grandchild
  • GGGG Uncle of your first cousin's GG grandchild

You are the:

  • Child of your parents
  • Sibling of your siblings
  • Nephew of your uncle
  • Uncle of your sibling's children
  • First cousin of your first cousin
  • First cousin once removed of your first cousin's child
  • First cousin twice removed of your first cousin's grandchild
  • First cousin three times removed of your first cousin's great grandchild
  • First cousin four times removed of your first cousin's GG grandchild

Your son is the:
  • Nephew of your siblings
  • Great nephew of your uncle
  • First cousin once removed of your first cousin
  • Second cousin of your first cousin's child
  • Second cousin once removed of your first cousin's grandchild
  • Second cousin twice removed of your first cousin's great grandchild
  • Second cousin three times removed of your first cousin's GG grandchild

Your grandson is the:
  • GG nephew of your uncle
  • First cousin twice removed of your first cousin
  • Second cousin once removed of your first cousin's child
  • Third cousin of your first cousin's grandchild
  • Third cousin once removed of your first cousin's great grandchild
  • Third cousin twice removed of your first cousin's GG grandchild

Your great grandson is the:
  • GGG nephew of your uncle
  • First cousin three times removed of your first cousin
  • Second cousin twice removed of your first cousin's child
  • Third cousin once removed of your first cousin's grandchild
  • Fourth cousin of your first cousin's great grandchild
  • Fourth cousin once removed of your first cousin's GG grandchild

Your GG grandson is the:
  • GGGG nephew of your uncle
  • First cousin four times removed of your first cousin
  • Second cousin three times removed of your first cousin's child
  • Third cousin twice removed of your first cousin's grandchild
  • Fourth cousin once removed of your first cousin's great grandchild
  • Fifth cousin of your first cousin's GG grandchild
Copyright 2011 - Richard E. Henthorn

George and Eva Catherine (Yoho) Lemley

This morning I uploaded, Lemley.htm to MyBox on the Box.net. This is a six generation descendant chart for the family of George and Eva Catherine (Yoho) Lemley in the HTML format, suitable for viewing with your web browser. For many years this webpage was available on my AOL website. After making a few changes I'm happy to be able to make it available again to those who have access to the appropriate folders on MyBox.

The file resides in the Yoho folder which is one of the folders in the Marshal-Wetzel-WV folder on MyBox.

Mr. Dickie
20 Feb 2011

Saturday, February 19, 2011

Salvaging My Genealogy Work


When AOL dropped free website support at the end of 2008 it was a disaster as far as sharing my genealogy information was concerned. Since then I have tried several other ways to share. I created two Google blogs: Henthorn Genealogy News and Henthorn Genealogy Obits. More recently I opened an account on Box.net where I share information in MyBox with collaborators to whom I grant access. The blogs are public and MyBox is by invitation only.

I came up with a way to salvage, and share, some of my genealogy data that's in HTML format. With minor modifications I can get it ready to upload to MyBox where my collaborators can download and view the page with their own browser. I've tested the idea and found it works nicely with Firefox. It's like having a website that can only be viewed by folks who have been granted access.

To test the idea I uploaded Seven Generations of Thomas and Elizabeth (Baskins) McCoy to the MonroeCountyOhio folder on MyBox. Collaborators with access to this folder can test out how it works. When you have the McCoy.htm file name displayed on the screen don't click to preview the file. You can't see the entire webpage from the "preview."

Rather,
  • Find the "down" arrow to the right of the file name.
  • Click on that arrow.
  • Next click on the "Download" line.
  • A dialog box pops up on the screen
Chose
  • "Save" the file on your computer, or
  • "View" the file with your browser.
If you have any problems understanding the steps let me know and I will try to help out.

Your feedback about your experience will be appreciated.

Mr. Dickie
19 Feb 2011

Sunday, February 13, 2011

Place Name Order

Place Name Order

Here's how I entered cemetery names in my genealogy records.

City/Town Name, County Name followed by "Co.," State Abbreviation, Cemetery Name


You might ask the question, "Why did you enter the cemetery name last, rather than first?" The reason I do this is because in a sorted place name list I want to see the names of all of the cemeteries in a particular geographic location together in the list.

For example in my Conger file, in the case of Cameron, Ohio, I used four place names. Here's how they look in a sorted place name listing.

Cameron, Monroe Co., OH
Cameron, Monroe Co., OH, Atkinson Cemetery
Cameron, Monroe Co., OH, New Cameron Cemetery
Cameron, Monroe Co., OH, Old Cameron Cemetery

Did I make my point? If I'd entered the cemetery names first the four place names would have appeared in the place name list in four different locations, in the "A," "C," "N," and "O" parts of the listing.

Mr. Dickie
13/Feb/2011 10:39

On genealogy: Keep family research alive after you`re gone - Broomfield Enterprise

On genealogy: Keep family research alive after you`re gone - Broomfield Enterprise:

Jule Miller, Enterprise columnist
Posted: 02/13/2011 12:00:00 AM MST

"What is going to happen to your genealogy research when you are gone? This is not a subject most of us want to think about. However, it is something for which all genealogists should take time to plan."

******

Mr. Dickie says:
Do you have a plan? After your death what will happen to the genealogy information you gathered and organized? None of us should count on anyone else to take care of this matter for us.

I have donated some of my work to genealogy libraries. Consider, The Library of Congress; the LDS library in Salt Lake City; the Allen County Library in Fort Wayne, IN; the DAR library in Washington, DC; the NGS library in Washington, DC.

Friday, February 11, 2011

Ancestor Search Blog: Who Do You Think You Are? Episode Schedule 2011

Ancestor Search Blog: Who Do You Think You Are? Episode Schedule 2011:

"Who Do You Think You Are?
Season 2 Episode Schedule 2011
NBC has just released the following dates for WDYTYA

Second episode tonight, 11 Feb 2011

Counties Count

Counties Count

Often when genealogy information is shared I run into a problem with place names. The person who first recorded the name of a place where a life event occurred didn't write down the county name. The result is that we really don't know where the person was living at the time of the event. This is because in some states the same place names were used more than once. It's bad enough when two places in the same state have the same name. Imagine the confusion when there are more than two.

Another problem with place names comes up when a county and a town in that county have the same name. How am I supposed to know whether the person who shared the information was referring to a town within a county or to the county?

When I first started doing genealogy I didn't take this problem into account. I've come to regret that. In recent years I've been working to correct the problem. I decided I'd use the abbreviation, "Co.," after the county name. For example: Bellevue, Sarpy Co., NE or just Sarpy Co., NE when I don't know the town name.

This week I have been editing the place names in my RootsMagic Conger family file. Yesterday I complete a first pass through the place name file associated with this family.

The place name edit project reminded me of another place name issue. Often when cemetery names were recorded, and shared, the person who wrote down the cemetery name failed to include the town and county name. This makes it difficult, if not impossible, to determine where the cemetery is located. Another cemetery name issue is failure to accurately record the cemetery name. This probably happens because many cemeteries don't have name signs.

Mr. Dickie
11 Feb 2011

Thursday, February 3, 2011

Ahnentafel Chart Numbers Explained

Ahnentafel Chart Numbers Explained
Richard E. Henthorn
3 February 2011

How to Read the Chart Below

  • /Generation/

  • {Number of People In This Generation}

  • [Ahnentafel Numbers from Number to Number]

  • - Who's in this generation

For example:
/06/ {00032} [00032-00063] - 3rd Great Grandparents

That is to say in the sixth generation of your Ahnentafel Chart a possible thirty-two people can appear with ahnentafel numbers ranging from 32 to 63 and all being your great-great-great grandparents.

A complete fifteen (15) generation ahnentafel chart would include the names of thirty two thousand seven hundred and sixty seven (32,767) individuals.

/01/ {00001} [00001-00001] - Child
/02/ {00002} [00002-00003] - Parents
/03/ {00004} [00004-00007] - Grandparents
/04/ {00008} [00008-00015] - 1st Great Grandparents
/05/ {00016} [00016-00031] - 2nd Great Grandparents
/06/ {00032} [00032-00063] - 3rd Great Grandparents
/07/ {00064} [00064-00127] - 4th Great Grandparents
/08/ {00128} [00128-00255] - 5th Great Grandparents
/09/ {00256} [00256-00511] - 6th Great Grandparents
/10/ {00512} [00512-01023] - 7th Great Grandparents
/11/ {01024} [01024-02047] - 8th Great Grandparents
/12/ {02048} [02048-04095] - 9th Great Grandparents
/13/ {04096} [04096-08191] - 10th Great Grandparents
/14/ {08192} [08192-16383] - 11th Great Grandparents
/15/ {16384} [16384-32767] - 12th Great Grandparents

Copyright 2011 - Richard E. Henthorn

Friday, January 28, 2011

Bible Genealogy

Warren W. Wiersbe writing about Bible genealogy in Chapter-By-Chapter Bible Commentary, p. 227 writes.

These names belong to real people who once lived on this earth. Now most of them are forgotten, their names buried in an ancient list. One day "you" will be a name in a record file somewhere. History may forget you, but heaven never will. ...

These names were written on earth because these people were born on earth. ...

These names belonged to what we would call "ordinary people." They were not all great men of faith like Abraham and David, but they all played a part in the working out of God's plan in this world. You may not consider yourself of consequence, but you are; every child of God has a place in God's heart and in His plan. Make yourself available to Him for the task He wants you to do, no matter how humble or unrecognized it may seem to you or to others.
28/Jan/2011 13:22

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Suter Family

This morning I uploaded a 90-page PDF genealogy about the ancestors of R.A. Suter (female) to the Marshall-Wetzel-WV folder on My Box.

The report includes some information about people in the following families: Suter, Parsons, Yoho, Watson, Wykert, Gorby and Baker.

Access to information in My Box is by invitation.

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

West, Samuel and Rebecca Henderson

This morning I uploaded a 51-page PDF genealogy about the family of Samuel West and Rebecca Henderson to the Marshall-Wetzel-WV folder on My Box. Samuel and Rebecca were related (cousins) prior to marriage.

The report includes some information about George Lemley and Catharine Yoho as well as about John Otho West and Sarah Lemley.

Some information in this file was shared by Samuel Lee West. I regret that I am no longer in touch with Mr. West.

Access to information in My Box is by invitation.

Monday, January 10, 2011

Okey, Thomas and Elizabeth Stockley

Thomas Okey and Elizabeth Stockley

Today I created a 172-page PDF report from one of my RootsMagic files. This report is about the family of Thomas Okey and Elizabeth Stockley. The report includes members of the Henry Yoho and Anne Phillips families. These families have roots in Monroe county, Ohio.

I uploaded the file to the MonroeCountyOhio folder on My Box where it is available to those whom I have granted access. Access is by invitation only.

Dick Henthorn

Saturday, January 8, 2011

Genealogy Center - Allen County Public Library

Home - The Genealogy Center - Allen County Public Library

The new Genealogy Center website of the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, IN.

I donated at least one document I compiled to this library.

John Henthorn and Frances Low

This morning I created three PDF reports for the family of John Henthorn and Frances Low of Uniontown, Fayette county, Pennsylvania.

These files are now available in My Box on Box.net to those who have been granted access to the OtherHenthorn folder.

Two of the reports are for smaller family groups within the John Henthorn and Frances Low family.
  • John Henthorn and Frances Low (379 pages)
  • David Jennings II and Mary Henthorn (213 pages)
  • James and Mary Quinn (27 pages)

Friday, January 7, 2011

John Henthorn and Frances Low

John Henthorn and Frances Low

Today I finished an edit project on my RootsMagic genealogy file of John Henthorn and Frances Low of Uniontown, Fayette county, Pennsylvania. This file includes 3,801 individuals and 1,468 marriages. Another family prominently featured in this file is the Jennings family.

The edits:
  • including the name of each person in the second line of their notes
  • adding sort dates, where needed, to insure that death information precedes burial information
  • adding nicknames to the Nickname field whenever possible
  • adding Copyright and contact information to the note of John Henthorn
I'm now able to produce a 446-page report, with an every name index, from this file. RootsMagic outputs reports in the PDF format.

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Pike County Illinois Families

Pike County Illinois Families

To get the year 2011 started off on the right foot today I created and uploaded four genealogy reports about Pike County, Illinois families. The reports were created from my RootsMagic genealogy file. The reports are in the PDF format and they reside in My Box on Box.net. Access to the reports is by invitation only.
  • Guy Louis Dougherty (11 pages)
  • Jacob Joshua Stauffer (76 pages)
  • Wells Cooley (176 pages)
  • Abraham Henthorn (329 pages)
The reports for the Henthorn and Stauffer families replaced information that was previously shared on Box.Net. There is some duplication between the various reports because the four families are linked by marriage.

Dick Henthorn
2 Jan 2011

Henthorns Rest: Our Ohio Roots

Henthorns Rest: Our Ohio Roots

Here's a link to the blog of Rodney Henthorn. He posted information about the Henthorns of Monroe county, Ohio, extracted from the Hardesty history of that place.

Dick Henthorn

Colonial Ties

Colonial Ties:

"COLONIAL TIES" - Website of Rebecca Bangsund

The Colonial Ties website is a genealogy and history work in progress. There will be mistakes that I hope others will help to correct. Keep in mind that not all of this research has been verified by first source records. Thank you to all the friends, family and researchers that have assisted in this project."

There are some recent updates on Rebecca's site.